Advisory Board Testimonials

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Sobel Aziz Ngom

Why are you interested in the Freedom of Mobility Forum?
I come from a part of the world where international mobility is a privilege, more than a right. My passport is “weak” and this has always affected my choices and opportunities (higher education, professional opportunities, leisure...).

What experiences would you draw on to help explore this theme? 
I would draw on my experience as a young African who was repeatedly denied visas to exercise his right to mobility, often for unfair and indiscriminate reasons. I have often opposed these decisions and led principled fights on the subject, taking advantage of my leadership positions as a youth representative with the governments concerned and in several international forums.

Freedom of mobility is a complex and multidimensional concept. In your opinion, what is the most immediate priority as it relates to the expectations of citizens? 
I would like to address the topic of freedom of mobility through the angle of accessibility and equity in various geographies: indeed, I am associated with a German woman named Victoria Peter, and although we live in a world that promotes equal opportunity, we’ve noticed a fundamental equity issue between the two of us when we travel.

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Massimo Ciuffini

Why are you interested in the Freedom of Mobility Forum?
I am interested in dealing with such difficult and complex issues in a multicultural and interdisciplinary context.

What experiences would you draw on to help explore this theme?
My experiences in this sector are very heterogeneous, in any case oriented towards the use of mobility and transport services and light and non-motorized vehicles. The focus of my job has always been how to promote accessibility, delivering better environmental outcomes, improved public health, stronger communities, and more prosperous cities.

Freedom of mobility is a complex and multidimensional concept. In your opinion, what is the most immediate priority as it relates to the expectations of citizens?
From my point of view, obviously, the priority is to understand how much it is possible to move around, at least in urban areas, without necessarily owning a personal vehicle and what are the technical, social and economic repercussions of a progressive demotorization after a century marked by the opposite trend. Another angle is how a new personal vehicle concept will be affected not only by emission standards, but also by other trends such as mass reduction policies, 30 km/h city speed limits, sharing paradigm but also the ratio between the cost of vehicles and the average disposable income.

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François Gemenne

Why are you interested in the Freedom of Mobility Forum?
I strongly believe in migration as a fundamental human right. Anything that can help advance this goal is of interest to me.

What experiences would you draw on to help explore this theme?
I have worked on the governance of migration and asylum for years, and have witnessed how migration and asylum policies were increasingly restricting the right to mobility.

Freedom of mobility is a complex and multidimensional concept. In your opinion, what is the most immediate priority as it relates to the expectations of citizens?
My priority angles concern both migration and climate change: how can we decarbonize the transport sector while maintaining some fundamental rights to mobility?

image of Kristina Lund image of Kristina Lund
Kristina Lund

Why are you interested in the Freedom of Mobility Forum?
The Freedom of Mobility Forum is complementary to AES’ strategy and my personal passions: AES is an international leader in sustainability and we are working to not only decarbonize the power sector, but also transportation and industrial processes.

What experiences would you draw on to help explore this theme?
In AES Utilities, we are leading the “inclusive” clean energy transition – we are not only aiming to drive down carbon emissions, but also to support community and economic development, so that all of our customers and communities are empowered by the energy transition.

Freedom of mobility is a complex and multidimensional concept. In your opinion, what is the most immediate priority as it relates to the expectations of citizens?
I am in favour of considering the social impacts of mobility transformations from a global point of view. I also believe it would be interesting to address the connections that need to be built and enhanced between the transportation and the energy sectors to develop new mobility solutions and relevant infrastructures worldwide. 

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Reema Nanavaty 

Why are you interested in the Freedom of Mobility Forum?
Although global infrastructural development and mobility programs focus on urban infrastructure, the issues and challenges of the poor informal sector rural women workers who form over 60% of the workforce in India remain largely left out, forcing these workers to continue spending a large portion of their income and productive time on mobility challenges.

What experiences would you draw on to help explore this theme?
Over 60% of SEWA’s members are from rural communities and live in remote interior villages. Our experience working with these women have shown that due to lack of reliable, safe and affordable access to public as well as private transport at their doorstep, a large portion of the rural women workers are confined to their villages and unable to join the labor force. This lack of freedom of mobility also restricts small and marginal farmers’ access to markets.

Freedom of mobility is a complex and multidimensional concept. In your opinion, what is the most immediate priority as it relates to the expectations of citizens?
Facilitating access to innovative clean and green mobility solutions to informal sector female workers would not only help solve their access to mobility challenges but also lead to reduction in carbon emissions. There is also a need for a policy framework that would link this reduction in carbon emission to carbon trading thereby helping make these solutions affordable for the poor. Thus, the most interesting priority in the context of the Freedom of Mobility Forum lies in 3As: Awareness, Affordability, Accessibility.

image of Jaehak Oh image of Jaehak Oh
Jaehak Oh

Why are you interested in the Freedom of Mobility Forum?
I am interested in reflecting on future mobility and on how we can find the appropriate balance between technological innovations, economic efficiency and social equity. I believe that social inclusiveness of future mobility requires continuous debates among citizens, politicians, industries, universities, etc. to solve potential conflicts that could inhibit mobility transformation.

What experiences would you draw on to help explore this theme?
Through various researches at KOTI, I have worked on many key transport policies, infrastructure investment decisions and also development of innovative transportation systems of roads, railways, aviation and logistics. Moreover, as President of EASTS, I can draw upon my experience and understanding of current and future mobility in East Asian countries to identify both local specificities and inspiring projects to replicate.

Freedom of mobility is a complex and multidimensional concept. In your opinion, what is the most immediate priority as it relates to the expectations of citizens?
There are many, such as:

  • Analysing social impacts and public acceptance of mobility transformation
  • Dealing with the digital gap in the transportation sector
  • Reflecting on sustainable transport infrastructure investments for regional levelling up
  • Innovating public transportation and mobility services for elderly or disabled populations in rural areas
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Carlos Tavares

Why have you launched the Freedom of Mobility Forum?
As a CEO, I believe that the environmental challenges ahead of us, coupled with the chaos of geopolitics, regulatory compliance, health and safety concerns, call for an efficient, global, fact-based, transparent and inclusive 360-degree approach involving all those who wish to contribute to building sustainable mobility. As a citizen and grandfather, I am concerned by the choices and trade-offs ahead of us, as we work to build a decarbonized world for future generations. I believe that freedom of mobility for citizens is at risk in today’s society. There are more and more constraints and obstacles that prevent us from going from point A to B at our leisure. It’s imperative that we develop clean, safe and affordable solutions that give citizens “breathing space” and the ability to move freely.     

What experiences would you draw on to help explore this theme? 
Given the scale and scope of Stellantis, I have the great opportunity to truly get a global view of the issues at hand. Today, I work with some of the most fresh, creative and strategic people to leverage my more than 40 years of experience. I trust the collective intelligence to enhance a thoughtful discussion about the challenges ahead of us. I will also bring my deep knowledge of the industry and my experience of global and local mobility ecosystems, as I believe we need to nurture new alliances and synergies, beyond traditional frontiers.

Freedom of mobility is a complex and multidimensional concept. In your opinion, what is the most immediate priority as it relates to the expectations of citizens?
The biggest challenge that we’ll have in the next few years is going to be the affordability of technology. Without affordability, the middle class will not be able to join the club of citizens who enjoy freedom of mobility and contribute to lower CO2 emissions with a massive impact for the benefit of our planet. To be real, freedom of mobility must be protected and then built together, with strong collaboration between all the stakeholders, without dogmatism. We need to team up and act collaboratively.